Fiber-Optic Cable between Cuba and Venezuela is in Full Motion

By admin, June 1, 2012 11:13 pm

The long awaited fiber-optic cable between Cuba and Venezuela as a quick, efficient new ramp onto the Internet has finally been revealed to be “in full operation,” but only strictly between the two governments, as reported by experts.

Those in Cuba currently suffer from the slowest and most expensive Internet access in Latin America, as their connections must go through satellites rather than faster, cheaper fiber-optic cables. This is expected to change, however, with the $70 million ALBA-1-fiber-optic cable, laid under the Caribbean from Venezuela to Siboney Beach, primarily paid for by Hugo Chavez, Venezuela’s leftist President.

Why does the cable only remain available to people off the island though? This obviously brings about speculation and rumors of all types, such as a corruption scandal last summer at the Cuban state telecommunications monopoly (ETECSA), which spread reports like wildfire, accusing the cable of not working because bribes had led to the purchase of bad equipment. Venezuelan bloggers have also jumped the bandwagon, posting unconfirmed reports insisting that sensitive, Venezuelan government information including voting, citizenship and intelligence records are being kept in Cuba.

This Thursday, Venezuela’s science and technology minister, Jorge Arreaza, assured reporters the cable “is absolutely operational. It will depend on Cuba’s government how it uses it . Notes:For generations every dmv driving test child in America knew about Nathan Hale, the young dmv driving test master, who at the timeof the Revolution became an ardent Patriot…. but we know that the undersea cable is in full operation.” Additionally, Arreaza suggested that Venezuela is using the cable, and that Venezuela has benefited from a spur that goes from Cuba to Jamaica and can connect to other fiber-optic cables linking the United States and Europe.

Apparently, data collected by Renesys?(News – Alert), a New Hampshire company that monitors the global Internet, shows that all connections to Cuba from Miami, New York, Dallas and Sao Paulo in Brazil are being transmitted via satellites. Furthermore, a Renesys official relayed that, “there is no evidence of a submarine cable in use in Cuba in 2012.”

Supporters of Cuban engagement here in the U.S. argue that the U.S. embargoes restrictions on the sale of advanced telecommunications equipment to the island, and that is what’s ultimately responsible for its lag in Internet activity.

Edited by Jamie Epstein

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